OVERCLOCKING VS BOOST

Long ago when machines were not as sophisticated as modern ones, many turned to overclocking in order to boost performance.

The AMD Athlon X2 4200+ was not very successful at overclocking. The front side bus could be increased slightly which improved memory bandwidth more than anything.

The AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition was more successful. The default speed of 3.4 GHz was easily moved to 3.9 GHz and the machine was still stable.

BOOST

3rd-gen-r5-series-processors

Graphics cards started offering a boost feature over and above the standard operating performance. This feature allowed cards to automatically increase performance at the expense of increased power consumption.

The AMD Ryzen processors in use also have a boost feature. The R5 3600 runs at 3.6 GHz for a 65W power envelope. The boost however can reach 4.2 Ghz which does increase the power required.

The boost feature with graphics cards and processors eliminates the need for overclocking.

The AMD Radeon software has a feature for increasing the available power which I recommend. A custom fan profile is not a bad idea either to keep the cards cool I crank fans to 100% at temperatures above 75°C.

POWER SAVINGS

While the boost feature appeals to the gaming community the power savings when the player is slumped over the keyboard are equally impressive.

The Corsair AXi and HXi series power supplies are 80 plus platinum. The new AX850 and AX1000 offer 80 plus titanium. The relatively expensive HX1000i is so efficient that it is a tough act to follow. The 80 plus gold RM750x is a solid affordable choice for the gaming enthusiast.

The power waste with older less efficient power supplies can cost a fortune more for a given hardware configuration. A more efficient power supply therefore saves money which justifies the upgrade.

With the Windows 10 power saver plan, the R5 3600 is pretty much running at 2.2 GHz all the time. Even more is core parking which switches off some of the unneeded processor cores which saves even more power. At idle the R5 3600 uses less than 10W of power even with Windows active.